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The Paleo Diet for Celiacs?

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Paleo Diet for Celiacs?

I’ve been struggling mightily with this one.

Seriously, I just deleted a couple pages I’d already written, and then decided that was very stupid.

Here’s the thing.  I’ve said before that living healthfully and gluten free is a lifestyle, not a “diet.” I just hate the connotations that come along with the word diet.  There’s so many wacky “diets” out there.  And for some reason, whenever something is a “diet,” there’s always individuals who seem to latch on to the ideas or principles presented, as the next great thing that is going to cure cancer and clean your kitchen to boot.

In all fairness, the Paleo Diet in it’s purest form is a way of eating, not a “diet.”  It’s kind of exploded beyond that though.

Is that a hotdog?

Photo Credit Rakka

A few weeks ago, I was having a e-discussion with my friend about food, eating, and diet.  We share many of the same views about food in general, and she mentioned how she seems to find weight control more successfully and easily when following a Paleo-like diet plan.

So what is this Paleo, you may be saying?

According to Wikipedia (really, where else would you look,) “The modern dietary regimen known as the Paleolithic diet (abbreviated paleo diet or paleodiet), also popularly referred to as the caveman diet, Stone Age diet and hunter-gatherer diet, is a nutritional plan based on the presumed ancient diet of wild plants and animals that various human species habitually consumed during the Paleolithic a period of about 2.5 million years duration that ended around 10,000 years ago with the development of agriculture. In common usage, such terms as the “Paleolithic diet” also refer to the actual ancestral human diet.[1] Centered on commonly available modern foods, the “contemporary” Paleolithic diet consists mainly of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, roots, and nuts; and excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar, and processed oils.[1]

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That sounds pretty good, for starters, right?

Meats, veggies, fruit, nuts-this sounds like what I talk about all the time.  This Paleo thing sounds pretty good, right? And the fact that grains are excluded makes it a slam dunk for celiacs for, as we know and feel, grains carry the gluten that affect our intestinal wall.

Well, yes, kind of.

I  love the foods that they include – meat, seafood, natural oils, grass-fed butter, fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds.  All naturally gluten free, all can be highly nutritious.  What I don’t like so much are all the exclusions – dairy, legumes, potatoes.  I like beans, and find them a good source of protein and carbohydrate.  Tasty, too.  Same goes for dairy, although I very much limit intake of dairy.  And no rice, ever?

Maybe it’s just the inner rebel in me, but if someone says I can’t have something it makes me want it more.

I’ve recently been reading more from Mark Sisson at Mark’s Daily Apple.  He’s taken a riff on Paleo, and called it Primal .

From what I’ve read, his approach is a bit more realistic, and flexible, which I like.  He even indicates that dairy and rice (gasp!) would be acceptable in certain circumstances.

Robb Wolf also has a bit more flexibility in approach, especially for athletes, and I like that quite a bit.  I recently listened to a podcast interview with him and if I am remembering correctly, his Mom has celiac disease.

Another person with some good stuff to say is Dr. Kurt Harris at PaleoNu.  He has a 12 step “getting started” which I like quite a bit, with the exception of meal frequency (I think it’s more individual than he indicates.)

Here’s one of my big issues with the Paleotards, and those non-obsessed, but following one principle I have issue with. Insulin secretion is not, in fact, the devil.

James Krieger did a great overview of insulin on his blog, which I highly recommend you check out.  Here’s the Cliffs Notes version: insulin is not necessarily bad, although it can be circumstantially, and if there is not a caloric surplus, (yes, calories do matter,) fat will not be stored.  I also very much like the analogy that Kurt Harris uses of insulin being like a bouncer at a club.  Logic and reason for the win.  Insulin in the face of a caloric deficit will not magically make you fat.

Also, there is no magic to eating in a Paleo fashion which will make you lose weight.

A higher protein intake is recommended, and that is something I wholeheartedly support.  However, there is no “metabolic advantage” to a higher protein diet.  As James Krieger so eloquently illustrated in another post on his fine blog, the magic isn’t magic… it’s satiety.

Satiety=feeling full.

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A lower carbohydrate, higher protein diet makes you feel fuller.

So, you eat less. The magic happens because you are eating less CALORIES!  Yes, it’s easier because you feel fuller, but it’s not magic.

So is the Paleo or Primal way of eating a good way to go for celiacs?

I think it’s a good start.  My personal approach is more moderate.  I do recommend, and personally choose, to eat whole, naturally gluten free foods most often. That does, for many parts, coincide with the Paleo approach.  However, I don’t like being exclusionary, especially to entire groups of food (like dairy, if you tolerate it.)

Accept no approach blindly.  Do your research, get educated, consult one or more professionals, and make an informed decision.  Don’t be afraid to take bits and pieces from different areas and make them your own.  Find what works for you and call it…. say, the Frankenstein Diet.  I like it. What do you think?

Have you put together your own Frankenstein?  Have you tried Paleo?  Hit it up in the comments!

How Much Gluten is Too Much Gluten?

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How Much Gluten is Too Much Gluten?

Last week I listened to a radio show (on my IPod-so a replay of said show-episode 504 of Superhuman Radio) where they were discussing organophosphates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency lists organophosphates are the basis of many insecticides, herbicides, and nerve agents which are very highly acutely toxic to bees, wildlife, and humans (Clothianidin – Registration Status and Related Information. U.S. EPA. 27 July 2012.)

The use of organophosphates is way beyond the scope of this article, but basically some insecticides fall under this category.  Use of insecticides must fall under what is considered a “safe” level of exposure with residuals on food.

The guest on the radio show contended that while this may be “safe” for an isolated incident, what about when we repeatedly ingest the “safe” level?  What happens then?  Does it build up to “unsafe” levels in our bodies?

My brain started spinning like a hamster on a wheel, as I thought…

Does this happen with gluten?

Is gluten exposure additive?

Don’t touch that! (Photo credit Dimitri_C)

The proposed labeling for “gluten-free” by the FDA is if a food meets the following conditions, and DOES NOT INCLUDE:

  • An ingredient that is a prohibited grain,
  • An ingredient that is derived from a prohibited grain and that has not been processed to remove gluten,
  • An ingredient that is derived from a prohibited grain and that has been processed to remove gluten, if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food, or
  • 20 ppm or more gluten

Food can be labeled gluten free and still contain some gluten

I knew that, probably we all knew that.  I never thought about it potentially building up in my system though.  It makes sense that it could cause additional damage to the intestine.  What happens  if a large amount of food, which has been processed to be gluten free (but contains 20 ppm of gluten), is consumed?  Perhaps one item containing 20 ppm is “safe”, but if a person were to have 5-6 items through the course of a day, now that’s potentially 120 ppm in a day.  How does that affect us?  How do you think it affects you?

We live in an imperfect world

Risks are taken every day.  I could get hit by the proverbial bus tomorrow.  Food manufacturers are doing their best to minimize gluten exposure to celiacs (we hope).  Personally, I minimize my risk by choosing primarily naturally gluten free foods.  Barring cross contamination, there is 0 (zero) ppm of gluten in a steak, sweet potato and broccoli.

Wіth ѕuсh аn extensive list оf items оr products tо avoid, іt іѕ understandable tо wоndеr what іѕ safe tо eat, оr prepare foods with. Luckily, the list оf safe items іѕ јuѕt аѕ long, some examples include the fоllоwіng Gluten free food products;

Vegetables, ѕuсh as;

  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Beans
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Corn
  • Cucumber
  • Garlic
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Radish
  • Spinach
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Turnips

Fruits, such as;

  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Blueberries
  • Cranberries
  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Grapes
  • Kiwis
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Oranges
  • Passion Fruits
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  • Tangerines
  • Watermelons

Meat аnd Poultry products аrе оftеn okay, such as;

  • Beef
  • Buffalo
  • Chicken
  • Duck
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Turkey
  • Veal
  • Venison

Dairy Products (be careful of dairy sensitivities), such as;

  • Butter (check tо verify nо gluten-containing products wеrе used)
  • Cheese (except blue cheese)
  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Yogurt (unflavored, plain)

This is not to scare you

Just be aware, think it over, Understand the Label, and make an informed decision on what you put in your body.  Food is your fuel. Don’t kill your engine with less than optimal fuel and certainly, the healthiest possible for your body.

What do you think on the labeling guidelines?

Gluten Free Nutrition Balance

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How to Balance Gluten Free Nutrition

Calories are a measure of the amount of strength in meals. Knowing what number of energy are in our meals can assist us to balance the power we put into our bodies with the strength we use. That’s the important thing to a healthful weight. It can assist us to maintain the quantity of energy we are consuming and ingesting. We degree the burden of that object of food in kilograms

The calorie content material of many ingredients is stated on the packaging in the nutrients label, which you will frequently discover on the lower back of the packaging. This information will appear under the “energy” heading. The calorie content is frequently given in “cal” or “kcal”, which is brief for “kilo-calorie”, or in kj, which is brief for “kilo-joules”. Kilo-joules are the metric measurement of calories. To find the energy content material in kilo-joules, multiply the calorie parent by means of 4.2.

The label will commonly let you know what number of calories are contained in one hundred grams or one hundred milliliters of the meals or drink, so you can evaluate the calorie content material of various products. Many labels can even state the variety of calories in “one portion” of the food.  You may use the calorie records to evaluate how a particular meal suits into your everyday calorie intake. The average man’s needs 2,500kcal (10,500kj) to keep his weight, and the average female needs 2,000kcal (8,400kj).

For amazing information on reading the label, check out our previous article: http://glutenfreefitness.com/understanding-the-label/

When on a fitness routine, between 10 and 35 percent of your daily calorie intake should come from protein sources, but meeting that goal can be tricky if you’re on a gluten-free diet, which doesn’t include as many fortified foods as an unregulated diet.

One of the best sources of protein is: lean meats and poultry, as long as, you choose fresh rather than processed or prepared versions of your favorite meat or poultry, you can consume your favorite meats without worrying about their gluten content. Meats and poultry are all gluten-free in their fresh form. Cooked turkey and chicken breast have 25 and 26 grams of protein per 3-ounce serving.  Another great source is gluten-free protein powders or protein bars:  Gluten Free Fitness Store

Low-Fat Milk

Low-fat milk contains no gluten and is an excellent source of lean protein, with 8 grams in one cup. Just be sure you don’t add any flavorings to it that contain gluten, and you can meet part of your protein needs with low-fat milk. Drink milk with meals instead of soda or tea or add it to gluten-free cereal.

Eggs

Fresh eggs are full of healthy protein and are gluten-free. Boil them, or prepare them in any way that doesn’t introduce gluten, and you can boost your daily protein intake. One whole egg contains 6 grams of protein.

Beans

Beans don’t have any gluten by themselves, so as long as you prepare them without adding any gluten, they’re a gluten-free meal component. Beans are also a good source of protein, so including them in your diet is a good way to ensure you meet your body’s protein needs. Serve them over rice and veggies for a complete meal, make them into a soup using water or add them to your meal as an easy side dish. A 1/2-cup serving of boiled soybeans contains 14 grams of protein while a 1/2-cup serving of canned kidney beans contains 7 grams of protein.

Nuts

Nuts are a good source of protein, and as long as, you opt for plain versions rather than those with added flavors or preparations, they’re also gluten-free. Try tossing them in a salad or eating a handful instead of chips with your lunch. A 1/2-cup serving of dry, roasted peanuts contains 14 grams of protein, and a 1/2-cup serving of walnuts contains 9 grams.

With these diets, you can easily balance a gluten free nutrition.

 

Special Note: Don’t forget to get tested by a medical professional for an allergy you may have that could adversely affect the message in this article, such as when consuming dairy or nuts.