Gluten Free Fitness

Gluten Free and Dairy Free Protein Powder Review: PlantFusion

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Thanks to Amanda at Gluten Free Maui for the heads up on this product!

For many of us with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, other food intolerances come along for the ride.  I personally seem to do just fine with dairy, and for a very long time I only used whey and/or casein (dairy derived) protein powders when the need arose.  After learning how common dairy intolerance was, I did a bit of research and compiled Dairy Free/Gluten Free protein powder 101.  There are several options out there that are dairy and gluten free.

(Side note: Of course, eat whole “real” food whenever possible.  However, there are instances where a protein powder can be much more convenient, and it can also be used as a sweet treat.)

Plant Fusion protein

It leaps tall buildings in a single bound…whoops, wrong superhero

PlantFusion

PlantFusion is a “multisource plant protein.”  Basically, they’ve taken the options that I previously outlined in DF/GF protein powder 101 and combined them.  The protein blend uses pea protein, brown rice protein, and artichoke (!) protein.  This is a good thing, because these different proteins have complementary amino acids when combined together.

They call it a “hypoallergenic protein” because of the things it does NOT contain:

  • No Dairy
  • No Soy
  • No Eggs
  • No Wheat
  • No Gluten
  • No Peanuts
  • No Tree Nuts
  • No Fish
  • No Shellfish

Voila-it’s vegan!

Also, PlantFusion protein uses stevia as a sweetener.  That is my personal sweetener of choice, so I was happy to see that.

I purchased a trial pack which contained one of each flavor: chocolate, vanilla, and unflavored.

(Funnily enough, the PlantFusion website does not have a shopping cart, nor does it send you to a site where you can but the products.  I had to google search it.)

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Scoop (Approx. 30g)
Servings Per Container: 30
Amount
Per Serving
% Daily
Value*
Total Calories 117
Calories From Fat 15
Total Fat 1.5 g 2%
Saturated Fat 0 g 0%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 360 mg 15%
Potassium 34 mg <1%
Total Carbohydrates 4 g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1 g 4%
Sugars (from fructose) 4 g
Protein 21 g 42%
Review

The individual samples came in what looked like a vitamin bottle, not a pouch, and that was the first time I’ve seen that type of packaging for a protein powder.

The taste is good-not overly sweet.  It does have a thicker consistency from the pea protein.  It does have a distinctive taste, not unpleasant, but distinctive as the vegan proteins I’ve tried in the past have had.  Almost an earthy nuttiness.

I do like the unflavored option, which would make it easy to add into baked goods or homemade protein bars, almond meal pancakes, or really any other application, sweet or savory.

All in all, this is a great option for those who cannot tolerate the dairy proteins, and yet need a portable and convenient protein boost.

Please leave your reviews of this product below!  Also, you can check out the Gluten Free Protein Powder Review page for more.

Don’t forget the check Gluten Free and Fit 101!

“Want” to Lose Weight but “Can’t?” Read This Book…

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I recently had to travel for work, and pulled out this little book that had been sitting on my bookshelf.  I had bought it from Amazon.  It was on my “recommended for you” list, and it looked good.  (They do a pretty good job with those, don’t they?  I don’t know what the algorithm is, but it’s pretty impressive.)  I’m writing it up now, before months go by like they did for my review of Generation Gluten Free.

The book was my plane reading, and it kept me both engrossed and entertained.

It will do the same for you, whether you are celiac and on a gluten free diet, living gluten free for other reasons, (like gluten intolerance, or avoidance of lectins-which by the way I will be touching on in a post next week) or not gluten free at all.  It really doesn’t matter.

If you are human, and you eat food, and you wonder if your eating is spurred by more than just physical hunger, you need to read this book.

It’s called Hungry: Lessons Learned on the Journey from Fat to Thin by Allen Zadoff.

The longer I’m in this game of nutrition and fitness the more I see that weight issues are very rarely just about the physical aspect of eating.

Eating is so tied into emotions for us.  Eating is celebration, eating is family, eating is love, eating is sorrow.

I’ve learned through my experiences in both the fitness industry and in “real life” that sometimes those individuals who look like they have the perfect body, the perfect life, are sometimes the most messed up of all.

In “Hungry,” Allen explores his journey in losing, regaining, and finally losing again, weight over a 28 year period.  In his journey he finds that life is not perfect when you are thin, and that there so many issues to deal with when it comes to food.  Although we all have our own personal journey, his story is very relateable.

He shares his discoveries of what helped him lose, and helps him maintain, his weight.  Here’s a hint-it’s not necessarily about counting calories.  You’ll have to read the book.

“Hungry” is an exploration of the psychological issues with eating and overeating; the awareness, recognition, and finally success over them.

You may not go through the same exact issues as Allen did, but I’m sure you can find tidbits where you can relate.

With Allen, you travel through despair, hopelessness, resignation, determination, reflection, and finally motivation and success.

Read this book, and take from it what will help you on your journey.

Even with a better handle on the psychology of weight loss, weight gain and overeating, you still need strategies for the physical aspects.

For that, you can check out Gluten Free and Fit 101.

I’m curious to hear-what psychological issues with food have surprised you, either in yourself, or what you’ve seen in others?