Nutrition Archives | Page 2 of 29 | Gluten Free Fitness

Gluten Free Fitness

Nutrition

Surviving Celiac Disease

14 Comments

When a person is officially diagnosed with Celiac disease, I am still surprised at how they cringe. As a fitness trainer, nutrition consultant and wellness coach I have the opportunity to speak with many people suffering from weight issues and medical issues. Upon referring certain clients to medical professionals for further testing, whenever Celiac is the culprit of the undiagnosed ailments there is always a sense of dread rather than relief.  This absolutely perplexes me, as I was undiagnosed for only 6 months but when we finally got the proper testing done and Celiac was confirmed, I was overjoyed! All I could think of was that I was going to heal myself without medicine or surgery.

As time went on I learned that there are people with Celiac who would actually rather have a disease that could be managed with medications. Although very surprised by this, I wanted to know more. Why? What is so scary about this disease? Is it the possibility of developing esophageal cancer? Is it the difficulty of absorbing minerals and vitamins? Is it the rash? No. The number one fear is the inability to eat the foods they love.

While I can absolutely empathize with this struggle, I believe that the bigger issue is lack of information. Usually people fall into 1 of 3 categories:

  1. Those who have no information on Celiac disease, or think it is a passing fad or “one of those food allergies”.
  2. Those who have been exposed briefly to someone who has Celiac or have little information about Celiac.
  3. Those who have Celiac or live with someone who has Celiac.

The first thing I make someone understand is that Celiac, while it is a complete lifestyle change, is not the end of good eating, dining out or even missing out on special events. In fact, it can be a blessing in disguise. Once a person truly understands the benefits of going gluten free, most of the time they become much less fearful. I start with talking about the inflammatory property of gluten, explaining how people with arthritis, Crohns disease and lupus all benefit from a gluten free diet. Less inflammation in the body leads to a reduction in pain, a reduction in gastrointestinal symptoms and overall a generally healthier life. People who go gluten free usually report an increase in energy levels and better skin conditions.  Many people who have been struggling with their weight despite their best efforts to exercise and eat properly, weeks after going gluten free report weight loss.

Celiac is controllable by what we eat. There are so many more options now than 7 years ago, when I was diagnosed.  There are tasty gluten free breads, beers and baked goods.  There are restaurants dedicated to gluten free eating and non-gluten free restaurants with a separate prep and fryer station in the kitchen area.  There are many ways to survive Celiac healthily and happily.  With the proper information, nutrition planning, fitness and medical care when necessary, Celiacs will live a close to normal lifestyle.  Once on the road to healing, a Celiac usually ends up feeling better than they ever have.

For those of you needing a simplified way of purchasing and preparing gluten free meals, try out our friends at Home Chef

Home Chef Horizontal

 

Yes initially it can be confusing and frightening, being diagnosed with the disease that was barely on the radar 20 years ago.  I can almost guarantee it is better than the alternative diagnosis you may have been looking at.  Find a professional, a support group or ask your doctor to help get you started. There are many on-line resources you can turn to as well.  www.glutenfreefitness.com is an excellent site filled with a plethora of information to help you, as well as, there are many books you can turn to. Once you begin to understand what Celiac is, how it affects your body and mind and how you can treat yourself, you will see that surviving celiac disease is not that hard after all.

Maria Faller

www.BeABetterYouFitness.com

Certified Nutrition Consultant

Certified Fitness Trainer

Certified Wellness Coach

Celiac/Food Allergy Mom

Gluten Free Nutrition Balance

No Comments

How to Balance Gluten Free Nutrition

Calories are a measure of the amount of strength in meals. Knowing what number of energy are in our meals can assist us to balance the power we put into our bodies with the strength we use. That’s the important thing to a healthful weight. It can assist us to maintain the quantity of energy we are consuming and ingesting. We degree the burden of that object of food in kilograms

The calorie content material of many ingredients is stated on the packaging in the nutrients label, which you will frequently discover on the lower back of the packaging. This information will appear under the “energy” heading. The calorie content is frequently given in “cal” or “kcal”, which is brief for “kilo-calorie”, or in kj, which is brief for “kilo-joules”. Kilo-joules are the metric measurement of calories. To find the energy content material in kilo-joules, multiply the calorie parent by means of 4.2.

The label will commonly let you know what number of calories are contained in one hundred grams or one hundred milliliters of the meals or drink, so you can evaluate the calorie content material of various products. Many labels can even state the variety of calories in “one portion” of the food.  You may use the calorie records to evaluate how a particular meal suits into your everyday calorie intake. The average man’s needs 2,500kcal (10,500kj) to keep his weight, and the average female needs 2,000kcal (8,400kj).

For amazing information on reading the label, check out our previous article: http://glutenfreefitness.com/understanding-the-label/

When on a fitness routine, between 10 and 35 percent of your daily calorie intake should come from protein sources, but meeting that goal can be tricky if you’re on a gluten-free diet, which doesn’t include as many fortified foods as an unregulated diet.

One of the best sources of protein is: lean meats and poultry, as long as, you choose fresh rather than processed or prepared versions of your favorite meat or poultry, you can consume your favorite meats without worrying about their gluten content. Meats and poultry are all gluten-free in their fresh form. Cooked turkey and chicken breast have 25 and 26 grams of protein per 3-ounce serving.  Another great source is gluten-free protein powders or protein bars:  Gluten Free Fitness Store

Low-Fat Milk

Low-fat milk contains no gluten and is an excellent source of lean protein, with 8 grams in one cup. Just be sure you don’t add any flavorings to it that contain gluten, and you can meet part of your protein needs with low-fat milk. Drink milk with meals instead of soda or tea or add it to gluten-free cereal.

Eggs

Fresh eggs are full of healthy protein and are gluten-free. Boil them, or prepare them in any way that doesn’t introduce gluten, and you can boost your daily protein intake. One whole egg contains 6 grams of protein.

Beans

Beans don’t have any gluten by themselves, so as long as you prepare them without adding any gluten, they’re a gluten-free meal component. Beans are also a good source of protein, so including them in your diet is a good way to ensure you meet your body’s protein needs. Serve them over rice and veggies for a complete meal, make them into a soup using water or add them to your meal as an easy side dish. A 1/2-cup serving of boiled soybeans contains 14 grams of protein while a 1/2-cup serving of canned kidney beans contains 7 grams of protein.

Nuts

Nuts are a good source of protein, and as long as, you opt for plain versions rather than those with added flavors or preparations, they’re also gluten-free. Try tossing them in a salad or eating a handful instead of chips with your lunch. A 1/2-cup serving of dry, roasted peanuts contains 14 grams of protein, and a 1/2-cup serving of walnuts contains 9 grams.

With these diets, you can easily balance a gluten free nutrition.

 

Special Note: Don’t forget to get tested by a medical professional for an allergy you may have that could adversely affect the message in this article, such as when consuming dairy or nuts.

Building Muscle on your Gluten Free Diet

No Comments

Building Muscle on a Gluten Free / Dairy Free Diet

Gluten is a protein found in many grains such as wheat, rye, barley and spelt. (Think of gluten like a glue that binds the food together or thickens up soups and gravies.)  Some foods that do not contain gluten in their natural state, such as oats, are usually processed on the same lines as gluten containing foods and therefor can become contaminated. Because many carbs we rely on for building muscle mass contain gluten, this can pose a slight inconvenience for those who are on a building plan that cannot tolerate gluten.  There is a small (but growing) percent of the population that cannot tolerate gluten, either from an allergy, sensitivity or Celiac disease.

Alternative Carbs for eating properly while gaining muscle mass include rice, quinoa, potatoes and flax. There are now many great alternatives to choose from including gluten free whole grain bread, rice cakes and, one of my personal favorites, cream of rice. Aside from these starchy carbs let’s not forget our protein and fats. Lean proteins are pretty much gluten free and safe to eat. Chicken, Turkey, egg whites, lean sirloin, shrimp, salmon, tuna and cod are just a few examples of lean proteins to fill up with when training for gains. Natural nut butters, avocados and coconut oils are great sources of fats to include in your daily regimen.

Protein shakes are a huge help and very convenient when trying to build more muscle. The problem here, is that finding a protein shake that is truly gluten free and truly dairy free (made in a dedicated gluten and dairy free facility) can be very tricky. I was using the same protein shake for years for fear of trying something new and having it affect my stomach. This protein only came in 2 flavors and while it delivered results, had a great ingredient profile and tasted good; it started to get pretty boring.  Also, it is important to switch up foods and fitness training as the body adapts and can plateau.

Over the past few months I have found 3 protein companies that cater to the gluten free / dairy free clientele. They contain safe ingredients, have a good amount of protein per serving and they taste good too. Utilizing the protein shake for building muscle is a great option, as long as you get the right protein. See, dairy free / gluten free nutrition while training for muscle mass is not as difficult as it once was years ago. There are many safe and delicious options available. Putting a proper nutrition plan into action is something I recommend seeing a professional for.  It is hard enough living with food allergies, intolerance’s and medical conditions requiring special dietary restrictions; adding a strict training regime to the mix is even harder! A professional can assist with enduring you are getting the proper amount of macro-nutrients daily to sustain your energy balance.

It is also important to mention that having Celiac disease damages the lining of the stomach which is responsible for absorbing nutrients. Many Celiac’s will find they are deficient in Vitamin d, b12, iron and magnesium. It is essential to eat foods high in these nutrients, especially when training as it is very taxing to the body. Building muscle, gaining mass and fitness training can hurt you rather than help you if you are not getting adequate nutrients.  Again, I advise beginners or the inexperienced to get help from a certified trainer and nutritionist before embarking on a muscle building plan. Also, it is important to advise your doctor before starting any new workout or nutrition plans.

 

Maria Faller

www.BeABetterYouFitness.com

Certified Nutrition Consultant

Certified Fitness Trainer

Certified Wellness Coach

Celiac/Food Allergy Mom

 

We have several other articles on gluten-free and fitness, as well as, gluten-free and dairy-free diet.  Come check them out!

http://glutenfreefitness.com/effects-dairy-gluten-free-diet/