5 tips for living gluten free and fit

Gluten Free Fitness

5 tips for living gluten free and fit

5 tips for living gluten free and fit

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Tip 1: Have a mindset of abundance

Celiac Disease can be a disturbing diagnosis. As much as we may be relieved to find the cause of why we feel so sick, there may be a sense of:

What?! I can’t eat what?!?

This can lead to a mindset of loss, and create negative feelings. It’s normal to feel a sense of loss – we are, after all, giving up a large number of foods. But we’re not giving up an even larger number of foods, by far.

So grieve your favorite gluten filled foods, have a symbolic burial ceremony if needed, and move on.

Explore the world of meats, cheese, rice, potatoes, vegetables, fruits, nuts, exotic oils and ancient gluten free grains.

(There are over 100,000 different variations of rice – who would’a thunk it?)

Your attitude in many ways shapes your thoughts – after all, perception is reality in many cases.

Look at Celiac Disease as a blessing in disguise.

Look at all the food that you can eat. And enjoy your gluten free food with an attitude of abundance.

Tip 2: Think of food as fuel

Fuel. The word alone conjures thoughts of power.

So often we forget. Food is the fuel with which we power our bodies. We get caught up in the everyday, mired in the mundane, stuck in the busy: and end up with whatever is handy in our mouths and bellies.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

With a little forethought and a tiny bit of planning, we can make it easier to fuel ourselves well. Think about it.

Would you put low quality gas in a high performance car and expect amazing 0-60 times?
Would you feed an award winning, money making racehorse low quality hay and expect it to win?

Not going to happen. And probably not something you would even consider doing.

Our bodies are incredibly designed high performance vehicles. And yet, for some unknown reason, we sometimes overlook using the optimal fuel.

Breakfast is a common time for people to fall into poor fueling habits. Time crunched, starved, or not hungry – we all have our excuses
Recipe. Here’s a great protein rich breakfast recipe to get you started.

Tip 3: Set process and practice based goals

What the heck do I mean by this? Lots of times when people set goals, they set outcome based goals. Like:

I will lose 10 pounds

I will run a mile

I will squat 200

While it’s good to have these goals, also think about the goals you need to achieve in order to reach those OTHER goals. Such as:

I will eat 5 servings of vegetables to day, and I will drink 3 liters of water.(To work toward the weight loss goal)

I will exercise daily, even if it’s not as long or exactly what I had planned on doing. (For the running goal)

I will squat once per week with emphasis on adding weight to the bar each session. (For the squat goal)

When we focus on the things we need to do to achieve an outcome, and make THOSE processes our goals – the outcomes take care of themselves.

If you make your goals to hit a certain number of exercise or activity minutes, and to hit certain amounts of food eaten – your weight loss goal will happen. You can’t hit the end goal without going thru the processes to get there.

So, look at what you have to do to reach your long term goal. And set goals for the PROCESSES you need to do to get there. Little steps, one at a time, to reach your goal. Consistent work over time gets you there.

Tip 4: Set yourself up for success

Whenever you begin something new, before it becomes habit, you have to actually think about performing it.

For example: Now, I am so accustomed to getting up early in the morning to exercise I can go on autopilot. I pop out of bed, brush my teeth, scrape my hair into a ponytail, and get dressed. Wander into the kitchen, grab a glass of water and a bit of fuel (I mean food 😉 Then into the office, 10 minutes checking email (no more,) and off to the gym or into the guest bedroom where the treadmill is.

All in 30 minutes from wake up time to beginning exercise. When I first started doing this, I had to take preemptive steps to keep me from staying in bed.

The alarm clock went across the room for a while. The clothes are laid out the night before. The fuel is set out on the counter for easy access. The computer has an alarm that goes off at 5:20 AM to make sure I am not responding to email any longer, and making myself late. Now, I’ve been doing it so long, it wouldn’t matter if I didn’t have these steps in place – I’d do them anyway.

But in the beginning, make it easy on yourself. Make the path of least resistance the path you want to take. It takes about a month to make a new habit, and lots of repetition. Prepare ahead to make those repetitions as easy as possible.

Tip 5: Be consistent, have patience. Rinse and repeat

When you have implemented and are practicing the tips we’ve already discussed, there still will not be anything magical that immediately happens. You have to be consistent with them, continue to do them repeatedly over time, and be patient. For a while.

I feel very lucky to have people compliment me on and ask about my physique. In fact, last week a woman asked me if I was an aerobics instructor. Nope. “Well, then you must teach yoga.” Nope. I replied that I lift heavy stuff, and follow smart nutrition strategies. For years. That was not quite the answer she was expecting….

But it’s the truth. The cliche’s are cliche because they are true. Rome wasn’t built in a day, anything worthwhile takes time, slow and steady wins the race, you can’t rush a risotto.

It takes a long time to build a habit, and just as long if not longer, to change it. So be patient. Be consistent. Be kind to yourself. We all have imperfect days. Just make the good outnumber the bad, the steps forward outnumber the steps back. You’ll get there.

If you need some more information to start, check out Gluten Free and Fit 101

But the most important thing is that you don’t just read. You have to do something about it.

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